How To Be A Great Singer – The Secret Formula

how to be a great singer

How To Become A Great Singer – Guaranteed

I am often asked questions about how long it takes to become a great singer or if I have a particular method that will instruct a student how to be a great singer. So, I thought I would share the simple answer to these types of questions in the short video below. Once you have watched this, you will know exactly what it will take for you to become an outstanding singer and precisely what to do in order to make your dream come true. Please do not be fooled by the simplicity of the advice given – it works!

video placeholder

16 Comments

  • Matt

    Reply Reply March 23, 2014

    It says “Unable to load video”

  • Anders Sundqvist

    Reply Reply March 23, 2014

    That is the single most honest and valuable piece of information I have heard in a very long time. It’s all about being honest to your self and your abilities. Showing up and putting in hard work and even more hard work. Thanks for sharing Tony.

  • Fran Carbonaro

    Reply Reply March 23, 2014

    Tony……thanks for telling the whole truth and nothing but the truth for singers and artists of all genres. A seamless technique is the bottom line and then comes all the rest…….

    • Tony

      Reply Reply March 23, 2014

      Thank you Fran ๐Ÿ™‚ I know that you also are a believer in this!

  • Claire Smith

    Reply Reply March 23, 2014

    Thank you for that, Tony. I’m really glad that someone has finally said that you need to work hard and practice to be good and successful. I’m currently learning to “fry scream” and, after 3 months, have just about got the basic sound. I read so many comments about people who say they have been trying to learn the technique for two weeks and can’t do it so they are going to give up. As you said, it takes years of hard work to master any vocal technique well. This is something I really want to learn and I’m prepared to put in the work and be patient until I have it right.

    • Tony

      Reply Reply March 23, 2014

      Hey Claire, thanks a lot for taking the time to reply. Nice to hear that you are making progress with the fry scream. Those type of vocal effects take some exploratory work and you have to have a good voice foundation already before you start adding any of these types of sounds. Patient persistent practice will get you there.

  • Matt Samudio

    Reply Reply March 24, 2014

    Its absolutely wonderful to hear this advice – thanks ! For me, its a confirmation of what I’ve suspected, but for so many years never had anyone around to advise me on.

    Hopefully, anyone that’s experienced seriously learning _any_ instrument will recognize the truth in the “commit hours and hours and hours” portion of your presentation. I’ve read recently that to truly master anything significant, it usually takes around 10,000 hours.

    One thing that really resonates with me is the insight about stripping back what isn’t working, and re-learning to correct problems, and especially expecting that to take both time and effort.

    • Tony

      Reply Reply March 24, 2014

      Hi Matt

      The 10,000 hour rule is quite accurate and I have also read that in many sources. It’s funny how we have no problem understanding that becoming a surgeon or specialist in a given field may take 7-10 years yet there are still people who want to master the voice in 3 months. The good news is that most people just don’t have the tenacity to stick to it so only the very best end up succeeding – you know – the lucky ones, with the ‘natural’ voices!

      Feeling a bit sarcastic this morning
      Tony

  • Gtrnflames

    Reply Reply March 24, 2014

    Thanks for the help Tony. Your free lesson “Bridging into Head Voice” has made a huge impact on reducing strain up to my break. I have been doing it several times a day since you put it up and I’m really hearing and feeling a difference. Right now I’m just working on having one voice all the way up and I’m having a lot of trouble with it. Anything above tenor c and it’s very gravely and completely stuck in my throat and sounds absolutely horrible. It sounds like Pumbaa from the Lion King (which is obviously bad. lol) I’ve been at this for about three years of daily practice but I can’t figure out how to get my high high notes to sound clean. I would devote all my waking hours to fixing this if I just knew how.

    Btw, you mentioned something about considering a membership website with videos and such for a variety of issues and techniques. Was just wondering if there is an update to that.

    • Tony

      Reply Reply March 24, 2014

      Thanks for your comment David. If you can get to tenor C cleanly then you should be able to take it higher as any of the problems you would normally encounter would be overcome by then. What level of intensity are you having to sing at to produce pitches such as D4 for example?

      The content for the website is FINALLY finished. I just need to edit it and upload it and I hope to get that done over the next few weeks:) Keep an eye out for an email closer to the release date.

      Kind regards
      Tony

      • Gtrnflames

        Reply Reply March 24, 2014

        Not sure. It might be a matter of finally understanding and using the correct muscles by keeping everything the same volume. This is something I have very little experience with up until I discovered and began practicing your head voice exercise. Something that me and a lot of other practicing vocalists have trouble with is this: Do we strive for more range by pushing the limits a little (like a weight lifter who adds a little weight for more resistance) or will those extra notes eventually just come once the correct muscles become stronger and stronger? For my part, I can sing “Run to The Hills” with the exception of perhaps one note at the end but it’s definitely in a different technique and sounds really awful. lol.

        At any rate, the new website is something I look forward to. I think you’re a killer singer and for my genre of progressive metal, I can’t think of anyone else that I’d rather learn from. I’m one of those guitarist/singers who enjoys singing but only started singing because there are no singers in my area that can pull off melodic metal. I got through my bands first album just fine with no complaints from people but for myself, I know I could have done so much more with a little more “good sounding” range.

  • Joel

    Reply Reply March 24, 2014

    So, can you teach me distorsion like Russel Allen in 3 lessons? Nah, just kidding ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks for sharing Tony, you are much more realistic than most of the get-great-quick singing teachers and methods out there.

    • Tony

      Reply Reply March 24, 2014

      Thanks Joel. I’m not trying to discourage people. In fact, I hope many will find encouragement from this video as it lets you off the hook. Often, singers give up too soon as they are not seeing results quickly enough. Once you understand the process better you can then just focus and know how to be a great singer ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Craig Sirianni

    Reply Reply April 2, 2014

    Bravo Tony! Well spoken. I was in the shed for 5 years with my teacher in NYC before he let me sing in public. Now, 25 years later, I still practice every day.

  • Sean

    Reply Reply October 31, 2014

    Thx Tony, well said. “To thine own self be true!” There is a great book called “Outliers” that refers to the “10,000 hour principle”. It is simple: just about anyone who is great at anything (painting, singing, a particular career, etc.) has put in about 10,000 hours. Just to put that into perspective if you sang Every Second of Every Moment of Everyday for 365 days, you would still only have 8,736 hours of singing practice. And, this is assuming you are doing nothing but singing (no sleep, no eating, etc.).

    Damn! I better practice some scales:)

Leave A Response To Matt Samudio Cancel reply

* Denotes Required Field